MoOC - Sharing Europe through European Heritage
Article
Video

1/ Building a digital Encyclopedia of European cultural heritage

The Virtual Encyclopedia of European Heritage is a multimedia resource that will be on-line in 2019. It is a presentation of the rich and varied heritage assets of European communities living all across the continent. The most prominent of these are portrayed- in all the diversity of their expression, uses and history-in articles supplemented with images and audio-visual media. This Encyclopedia is a resource that will constantly be developed and enriched with new articles and multimedia files.

Author

Laurier Turgeon
Research Chair in Cultural Heritage
Laval University, Quebec City, Canada
Member of the ProPEACE Team

The link of the Encyclopedia

http://www.propeace.eu/wiki/

Two-fold objective

The Virtual Encyclopedia of European Heritage has a two-fold objective. First, it is intended to be a resource for describing European cultural heritage, and to provide a selection of key European heritage sites and practices by drawing upon the most recent and relevant information available. In addition to offering the reader well-established, specialized knowledge on heritage, the Encyclopedia also intends to become a place where visitors can explore ideas and reflect on the ways in which heritage is created. Thus, it is the hope that this new resource will contribute new concepts and ideas to the very inner workings of heritage itself.

The project is innovative as much from the point of view of its content and as its format. Instead of insisting on the permanent character of heritage, the Encyclopedia presents it as a dynamic phenomenon that is perpetually under construction. To favor this approach, the authors turn their attention to the study of the mechanisms involved in the heritage-building process (heritagization). Much more than just a summary of the knowledge acquired of the various subjects presented, the Encyclopedia endeavors to reveal the inner workings and current social uses of heritage. It makes use of the latest medias, which have all been shown to be dynamic methods for communicating living heritage. Rather than being limited to written media, the Encyclopedia provides an account of the main elements of European cultural heritage by the means of various kinds of written, audio and visual media available on its interactive Web site.

The Social Role of Cultural Heritage

Heritage has become a major component of contemporary social life. International organizations such as UNESCO have adopted conventions intended to better preserve and manage world heritage. Governments intervene with increasing frequency in heritage-related issues, in order to develop policies designed to protect and promote heritage. Even the smallest of municipalities seek to develop sites or build museums to tell the story of their past, so as to foster a feeling of belonging among the community's residents, to attract tourists, or simply to make their existence known. Heritage compels public officials who strive to multiply and diversify occasions to promote it by developing sites, restoring buildings, erecting commemorative monuments and creating museum exhibits, and, to an increasing extent, by means of inaugurating intangible expressions of cultural heritage, such as fairs and festivals. Heritage seems to be everywhere, present in everything-and it has almost become a privileged means of identity building.

There has been a growing interest in heritage because it responds to a social need for roots and continuity in a world increasingly characterized by the transitory, fleeting and ever-changing nature of contemporary life. Furthermore, exposure to heritage fosters feelings of authenticity and permanence in a vibrant and dynamic way.

As opposed to history, which favors written records and books, heritage is based on material objects and performances to communicate the past. Thus, heritage offers a physical expression for memory and conveys it directly to the five senses, whether sight, touch or hearing, or even sometimes the senses of smell and taste by means of the re- enactment of certain culinary practices. Often appealing to the senses and emotions more than to reason, heritage concretely re-creates the past, showcasing or exhibiting it, as well as bringing it into the present and, as a result, turning the past into something alive and of interest to the general public. As Dominique Poulot points out, "it is in this way that history seems 'dead,' as common sense would have it, and heritage, in contrast, comes 'alive,' because of the beliefs and commemorative practices that are normally associated with it* Dominique Poulot, Une Histoire du Patrimoine en Occident, Paris, La Découverte, 2006, p. 3.." In addition, heritage also has the ability to galvanize individuals to social action. Instead of confining social actors to read in a private place, as the book so often does, it brings them together around a performance or a place rich with significance; it awakens a desire to live together, thereby reviving the group as a whole. At the same time, as it gives life to the past, heritage provides new life to the people who experience it.

Heritagization (the Heritage Building Process)

This is why the Encyclopedia presents heritage in terms of construction, as a work in progress, built and rebuilt by social actors. The goal is to understand how a building, a place or a practice becomes heritage. This is a formidable challenge because heritage construction is a complex and ever-changing process varying both over time and in accordance with the social groups involved. A site or practice recognized in one era may lose its heritage value in another. For example, intangible heritage (rites, fairs, festivals, traditional knowledge, stories, popular arts and crafts, etc.), though hardly thought worthy of consideration a mere 20 years ago, is perceived to have ever-greater value today. Likewise, what one group defines as heritage may not necessarily be so for another.

The very notion that heritage is a construct flies in the face of conventional wisdom. As a concept, heritage is founded on the idea of origins, authenticity, continuity, timelessness and even more importantly, that it is a means of transmitting and preserving these selfsame origins. Indeed, heritage practices and discourse are devised in order to create a belief in identities rooted in immutable times and places. In fact, heritage is often presented as self-determined, essential and irreversible-and it can be considered as eternal. However, the study of the various ways in which heritage is created and constructed demonstrates that it often consists of recent elements that are presented as being old, having been incorporated by the process of heritagization. Even the most time-honored elements are integrated into the present by the very process of heritage construction, as they are reinterpreted and their significance brought in to a contemporary context. For example, simply restoring of a building or an object often transforms its appearance in accordance with the aesthetic norms of the times, thereby giving as much importance to the present as to the past. Therefore, heritage consists of a reacquisition and thus a contemporising of the past.

Although built over time, heritage is also a social construct. The Encyclopedia explores this social dynamic of heritage by focusing on how the various elements and entities of which it is composed evolve, intermingle and must be negotiated in order to find common ground. When the history of heritage sites or objects is reconstructed, it becomes clear that such cultural proprieties are transformed over the course of their extensive social existence, sometimes as a result of borrowing from other groups or cultures. The transmission of objects and practices from one generation to another by way of inheritance-or from one culture to another by way of an intercultural exchange- often gives rise to acquisitions, transfers or transformations, not only of the objects and practices, but even of the groups involved. The objects or practices exchanged are integrated into the culture that acquires them and then they eventually become heritage through the process of "cultural re-contextualization". That is to say that their appearance is altered, they are given new significance and purpose, and then they are assimilated into the borrower's cultural fabric. In the end, the re-contextualized objects or practices also transform those people who deal with them* See Nicholas Thomas, Entangled Objects: Exchange, Material Culture and Colonialism in the Pacific, Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1991, p. 2-3.. Far from being a pure and authentic reflection of a specific culture, these objects exchanged over time bear the marks of a number of cultures and periods, thereby forming a "hybridised heritage"* I have developed this concept in my publication Patrimoines Métissés : Contextes Coloniaux et Postcoloniaux, Paris and Québec, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme and Presses de l'Université Laval, 2003.. Heritage construction is also the product of "negotiation." Jean Davallon points out that a heritage object's identity is constructed via not only the relationship between the object's creator and its user, but also through the relation between the one who interprets and the one who receives the interpretation* Jean Davallon, Le Don du Patrimoine : Une Approche communicationnelle de la Patrimonialisation, Paris, Lavoisier, 2006, p.16..

More than a simple inert object or location, heritage items and sites express a relation based, interactive dynamism between various individuals and groups persons who make use of them in order to forge social relationships. The cultural context of Europe is a field of research that is abundant in opportunities to study the interactive relational dynamics of heritage. This is largely due to the fact that European countries share a common past and that they have borrowed extensively from one another. Although the Encylopedia seeks to avoid compartmentalising heritage into strict categories and classes, it has however taken into consideration, the three main ways in which humans encounter heritage: natural (environmental) heritage, tangible (architectural and archaeological) heritage, and intangible (ethnological) heritage, which are the three broad heritage categories as they are defined by UNESCO. The Encyclopedia deals with all three forms of heritage, while paying particular attention to intangible heritage that, although quite prolific, has been very little studied. This type of heritage includes the performative aspects of a given culture, such as rites, celebrations, festivals, traditional knowledge, popular arts and crafts, stories, oral traditions, songs, music and dance

A Living Encyclopedia

As a living reflection of the phenomenon that it strives to describe, the Encyclopedia is intended to be a vitally dynamic endeavor, in that it involves participation, interaction and ongoing construction. It involves participation to the extent that society's perception as to the value of a heritage asset's role or use is an essential criterion for its selection and inclusion. Rather than only keeping to the formal criteria of ancientness and authenticity, the creators of the Encyclopedia seek to select and present heritage assets that are the most cherished possession and legacy of the communities from which they originated. Another way in which the Encyclopedia comes alive is by presenting its articles online and illustrating them with a rich and varied selection of images and audio-visual media. In so doing, the reader is not only able to read about heritage, but also see and hear about it live.

It is the desire of the architects and creators of this encyclopedia that open access to the site's articles and multimedia will facilitate the distribution of quality information on French cultural heritage in North America and encourage its re-acquisition. In this way, it is hoped that fresh knowledge will shared and enriched, all the while creating a dynamic community involved in researching, learning about and transmitting European cultural heritage in Europe and in the rest of the world.

The Encyclopedia's Editorial Approach

The articles must be original and not published elsewhere. Each professor is committed to writing one article and each group of students two articles. Articles must be submitted and approved by Laurier Turgeon and the editorial committee.

The Encyclopedia's editorial approach focuses on the heritage building processes (heritagization), whether through institutional, community-oriented or individual initiatives. Therefore writers are called to shed light on the cultural, social and political currents (movements and trends), as well as the contexts that lead to the building up of a heritage asset (heritagization), as well as to its perpetuation, successive adaptations and recognition. In some cases, the Encyclopedia will describe elements of heritage that are in decline or that have disappeared, and sometimes have even reappeared.

For each element of heritage included, the writer will give a description of its contemporary context, provide a history of the heritage asset and present the process in which it was built up over time.

Article Content

Each text must be no shorter than 1,800 words and no longer than 2,400 words (6–9 pages double-spaced using a word processing software) excluding notes, tables, illustrations and references.

Each article must contain the six following elements (in the prescribed order):

  • 1/ A brief introductory paragraph of between 75 and 100 words. This paragraph serves to introduce your subject. Its objective is to draw attention to the main characteristics of the heritage asset dealt with in the article. It should be clear and appealing and able to stand alone, since it will be published on various pages of the Encyclopedia website and should entice readers to continue reading rest of the article.
  • 2/ A description of a recognized heritage asset (site, building, custom, practice, individual or some other asset) in its integrity, just as it appears today.
  • 3) A historical introduction to the heritage asset that will, if relevant, give an account of how it was borrowed and underwent successive transformations.
  • 4) An analysis of the efforts to promote the recognition of the asset and to build (increase) its heritage value over time-particularly as to how its value relates to social, political and economic contexts.
  • 5) The name of the author, his or her occupation and institutional affiliation.
  • 6) A brief bibliography of 5 to 10 titles, including a selection of complementary works and the works cited in the article.

Article Writing-Style Policy

Each text must be a minimum of 1,800 and a maximum of 2,400 words long, not including notes, image captions and bibliographical references.

Policy:

  • •The text is to be written in a normal-style format (e.g. "Times New Roman") 12- point font, with no bold or underlined characters and no text in capitals or small capitals;
  • •Italics are to be used only for subheadings, foreign words and emphasis (sparingly);

  • The title:

    The title of the article should be neutral: it announces the subject without qualifying it; it is placed at the beginning of the text in capital letters with no formatting.

    Article Subdivisions:

    • •The first (introductory) paragraph is not preceded by any subheading and appears in bold immediately after the title;
    • •Sections: The rest of the article should be subdivided into sections of varying length, identified by subheadings;

    The author's name identification: The author's name, occupation and institutional affiliation are to be placed at the end of the article, before the notes and the bibliographical references (in that order).

    Quotations: Quotations are to be inserted into the text between quotation marks and the corresponding bibliographic reference information is to be included as endnotes.

    Endnotes:

    Endnotes are to be inserted using the automatic "insert reference" function in MS-Word, with no formatting.

    Bibliographical references:

    The bibliographical references and other source-related information for a book, article, periodical or archival document quoted in the text will formatted in accordance with the following bibliographical style:

    1 author

    Griffiths, Naomi, The Acadians: Creation of a People, Toronto, McGraw-Hill, 1973, 94 p.

    More than 1 author

    Bourque, Hélène, Donald Dion and Brigitte Ostiguy, L'île d'Orléans, un enchantement, Québec, Éditions du Chien Rouge, 1999, 48 p.

    Collective work

    Le Blanc, Ronnie-Gilles (Dir.), Du Grand-Dérangement à la Déportation : Nouvelles perspectives historiques, Moncton, Mouvange, 2005, 465 p.

    Journal or newspaper article

    Collectif, « Dossier île d'Orléans : le Goût de l'île », Continuité, no 73, été 1997, pp.17- 51.

    Research article

    Gaulin, André et Norbert Latulippe, L'île d'Orléans, microcosme du Québec, Association québécoise des professeurs de français, Québec, 1984, 137 p.

    Archives - textes - documents

    Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, RG 45, volume 135, carnet de notes d'arpentage n° 761, page 33, numéro de reproduction C-88047.

    Fictional Films

    Evangeline, long métrage de Raoul Walsh, États-Unis, 1919, avec Miriam Cooper et Alan Roscoe.

    Documentary Films

    Évangéline en quête, documentaire de Ginette Pellerin, Québec, Office national du film, 1996.

    Electronic documents

    « Lieu historique national de Grand Pré », Parcs Canada, site consulté le 29/06/06 [En ligne], http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-hs/ns/grandpre/index_f.asp

    Illustrations:

    •The text of each article should be accompanied by 5 or 6 illustrations: photographs, engravings, drawings, tables, maps or diagrams. These illustrations must be provided separately and be numbered. Writers must also indicate where they plan to insert them in the text by writing in capital letters: ILLUSTRATION 1, ILLUSTRATION 2, etc. at the appropriate places. The writer must provide complete reference information for these illustrations (see the following sections for questions concerning formats, media and copyrights!);

    •Brief captions, or at least a title indentifying the subject of each illustration, must accompany the illustrations. The captions should correspond to numbered bibliographical references included at the very end of the text, following the bibliography. (They will be inserted at appropriate place in the text by the team during the layout stage of the page formatting process).

    •As the Encyclopedia takes full advantage of the Internet's capability to distribute multimedia presentations of the various topics presented, writers are also invited to provide supplementary materials such as further readings, visuals, audios or audio-visual materials whenever possible. In the case that such additional material is included, writers will need to provide the corresponding complete references. At the very least (and whenever related to the topic) writers are asked to provide information that will help the Encyclopedia team locate such supplementary material in the case they deem it to be necessary.

    Copyrights and Distribution Rights

    •All supporting material should be free of copyright and Internet distribution rights. In all cases, writers must provide the Encyclopedia with complete bibliographical references and details (i.e. citations for works and document locations) that will allow the team to verify that the material provided is indeed free of copyrights or to acquire the necessary rights to this material;

    •Writers can communicate with the Encyclopedia as necessary for information on questions relating to copyright and broadcast rights or to make a preliminary agreement with the Encyclopedia to cover acquisition costs for broadcast rights.

    •Writers must provide a copy of their article, as well as the supporting documents, in MS Word format, preferably sent as an attachment by e-mail or as electronic media (CD-ROM) sent by postal service, to the electronic or land address indicated at the end of this document;

    •Illustrations should be sent as digital files (minimum resolution of 300 dpi, 5" x 7" printing format), by e-mail or on CD-ROM to the electronic or land address indicated at the end of this document. Photos or slides are also accepted, but the Encyclopedia is not required to return this material to writers. All illustrations must be accompanied by complete bibliographical references and details that enable the team to properly indentify them;

    •Audio material should be sent in digital MP3 or Wave format, although we accept other media and formats (such as CD, CD-ROM and audio cassettes). This material must also be accompanied by complete references;

    •Audio-visual material may be submitted in various media and formats (preferably digital files, on CD-ROM, or else on video cassettes). This material must also be accompanied by complete references;

    •Writers can contact the Encyclopedia for more precise information concerning technical questions related to formats and media.

    L'Encyclopédie virtuelle du patrimoine européen

    Version française

    L'Encyclopédie virtuelle du patrimoine européen poursuit un double objectif. Elle vise d'abord à décrire ce patrimoine en mettant à contribution les connaissances les plus récentes et les plus pertinentes. En plus de faire œuvre d'un savoir établi et consacré, l'Encyclopédie se veut un lieu de réflexion et d'exploration sur les manières dont se constitue le patrimoine. Elle souhaite donc contribuer aux nouveaux savoirs sur le fonctionnement même du patrimoine.

    Le projet est novateur tant par son contenu que par sa forme. Au lieu d'insister sur le caractère permanent du patrimoine, comme on le fait souvent, l'Encyclopédie le présente comme un phénomène dynamique, toujours en construction. Pour ce faire, les auteurs des articles s'arrêtent sur les mécanismes de la mise en patrimoine ou, pour reprendre l'expression désormais consacrée, sur la « patrimonialisation ». Plus qu'une synthèse des connaissances acquises sur les divers sujets traités, l'Encyclopédie a l'ambition de démontrer les rouages et les usages sociaux du patrimoine aujourd'hui. Elle fait appel à des nouveaux modes de diffusion tout aussi dynamiques pour communiquer ce patrimoine vivant. Plutôt que de se limiter au texte écrit, l'Encyclopédie rend compte des principaux éléments de ce patrimoine à l'aide d'un ensemble de documents diversifiés : textuels, visuels, sonores et audio-visuels, et d'un site Web interactif.

    La fonction sociale du patrimoine

    Le patrimoine est devenu une composante majeure de la vie sociale contemporaine. Des organismes internationaux comme l'UNESCO adoptent des conventions pour mieux gérer le patrimoine mondial. Les gouvernements interviennent de plus en plus dans ce domaine afin d'élaborer des politiques destinées à protéger et à promouvoir le patrimoine. Même les plus petites municipalités veulent aménager des sites ou construire des musées pour raconter leur passé, afin de développer le sentiment d'appartenance de leur population, d'attirer des touristes et de faire reconnaître leur existence. Le patrimoine mobilise les pouvoirs publics qui multiplient et diversifient ses expressions à travers l'aménagement de sites, la restauration de bâtiments, l'édification de plaques commémoratives, l'exposition muséale, mais aussi de plus en plus à travers ses manifestations immatérielles tel que les fêtes et les festivals. Le patrimoine semble être partout et en tout. Il est devenu un moyen privilégié de construction des identités. Ce succès n'est pas un hasard. Le patrimoine répond à une demande sociale de racines et de continuité dans un monde de plus en plus caractérisé par la mobilité, les mutations, l'éphémère. Plus encore, il construit de façon vivante et dynamique un sentiment de permanence et d'authenticité.

    Contrairement à l'histoire qui privilégie l'archive écrite et le livre, le patrimoine s'appuie sur l'objet matériel et la performance pour communiquer le passé. Ainsi, il matérialise la mémoire et la rend directement accessible à la vue, au toucher, à l'ouïe, parfois même à l'odorat et au goût par le biais de pratiques et d'événements divers. Sollicitant les sens et les émotions, plus que la raison, les manifestations patrimoniales reconstituent concrètement le passé, le mettent en scène ou en exposition, l'inscrivent dans le présent et, par conséquent, le rendent populaire et vivant. Comme le souligne Dominique Poulot, « c'est en cela que l'histoire paraît « morte » au sens commun et le patrimoine, au contraire, « vivant », grâce aux professions de foi et aux usages commémoratifs qui l'accompagnent* Dominique Poulot, Une Histoire du Patrimoine en Occident, Paris, La Découverte, 2006, p. 3.». Le patrimoine possède aussi un fort pouvoir de mobilisation sociale. Au lieu d'enfermer les acteurs sociaux dans l'espace individuel de la lecture, il les réunit autour d'une activité ou d'un lieu chargé de sens, il convoque le désir de vivre ensemble et il revitalise collectivement le groupe. En même temps qu'il donne vie au passé, le patrimoine redonne vie aux personnes qui le pratiquent.

    La patrimonialisation, ou la construction du patrimoine

    C'est pourquoi l'Encyclopédie présente le patrimoine comme une construction, faite et refaite par des acteurs sociaux. Il s'agit de savoir comment un bien, un lieu ou une pratique devient du patrimoine. C'est un défi de taille parce que la patrimonialisation est un processus complexe et changeant, variant dans le temps et en fonction des groupes sociaux. Un site ou un domaine reconnu à une époque peut perdre son statut patrimonial à une autre époque. Par exemple, le patrimoine immatériel (rites, fêtes, festivals, savoir-faire, récits), peu considéré il y a à peine vingt ans, est aujourd'hui de plus en plus valorisé. De même, ce qui est patrimoine pour un groupe ne l'est pas nécessairement pour un autre.

    Si le patrimoine repose sur l'idée d'origines, de pérennité et d'authenticité, plus encore sur l'idée de transmission et de conservation à l'identique de ces origines, il n'en demeure pas moins qu'il participe à un processus, celui d'une édification qui est par définition dynamique. À vrai dire, les discours et les pratiques du patrimoine se construisent pour faire croire à des identités enracinées dans des lieux et des temps immuables. Or, l'étude des modes de construction du patrimoine démontre qu'il est souvent constitué d'éléments récents, présentés comme étant anciens et intégrés au présent par le processus même de la patrimonialisation. Même les éléments anciens sont réinterprétés et leur sens réactualisé. Par exemple, le simple fait de restaurer un bâtiment ou un objet transforme souvent son apparence selon les canons esthétiques du moment, en faisant une place aussi grande au présent qu'au passé. Ainsi, bien souvent, le patrimoine est une réappropriation et donc une transformation du passé.

    Construction du temps, le patrimoine est également une construction sociale. L'Encyclopédie explore cette dynamique sociale du patrimoine en prêtant attention aux mutations, aux mélanges et aux médiations. Lorsque l'on reconstitue la biographie des sites ou des objets patrimoniaux, nous constatons qu'ils se transforment au cours de leur longue vie sociale, parfois à la suite d'emprunts faits à d'autres groupes ou à d'autres cultures. La transmission des objets d'une génération à une autre par la pratique successorale, ou encore d'une culture à une autre par l'échange interculturel, suscite des appropriations, des transferts et des métamorphoses tant des objets et des sites que des groupes concernés. Les objets échangés sont intégrés à la culture de réception; ils sont patrimonialisés par le processus de « re contextualisation culturelle » : on leur donne d'autres apparences, on leur attribue de nouveaux sens et usages et on les fait sien. Les objets recontextualisés transforment aussi les personnes qui les manipulent* Voir Nicholas Thomas, Entangled Objects: Exchange, Material Culture and Colonialism in the Pacific, Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1991, p. 2-3.. Loin d'être le reflet pur et authentique d'une culture, les objets échangés à travers le temps portent les marques de plusieurs cultures, de plusieurs périodes, et forment un « patrimoine métissé* Laurier Turgeon, Patrimoines Métissés : Contextes Coloniaux et Postcoloniaux, Paris and Québec, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme and Presses de l'Université Laval, 2003. ». La patrimonialisation procède aussi d'une médiation. Jean Davallon rappelle que l'objet patrimonial se construit dans une relation entre celui qui produit l'objet et celui qui en fait usage, entre celui qui le met en valeur et celui qui le découvre* Jean Davallon, Le Don du Patrimoine : Une Approche communicationnelle de la Patrimonialisation, Paris, Lavoisier, 2006, p.16.. Plus qu'une chose ou un lieu inerte, le patrimoine exprime une dynamique relationnelle et interactive, entre des personnes et des groupes différents qui s'en servent pour tisser des liens sociaux.

    Le cas du patrimoine culturel de l'Europe représente un terrain d'observation très riche pour étudier ces phénomènes dans la mesure où leurs patrimoines sont marqués par une histoire commune et par de nombreux emprunts faits par les pays européens entre eux.

    Nous gardant bien d'enfermer le patrimoine dans des catégories étanches, nous sommes sensibles aux trois principales formes d'expression du patrimoine, soit le patrimoine naturel (environnemental), le patrimoine matériel (architectural et archéologique), et le patrimoine immatériel (ethnologique), qui représentent les trois grandes catégories de patrimoine définies par l'UNESCO. L'Encyclopédie traite de ces trois formes de patrimoine, en portant une attention particulière au patrimoine immatériel, très abondant et encore peu étudié. Celui-ci comprend les éléments performatifs de la culture, comme les rites, les fêtes, les festivals, les savoir-faire, la mémoire orale, la chanson, la musique et la danse.

    Une encyclopédie vivante

    À l'image du phénomène qu'elle décrit, l'Encyclopédie se veut une entreprise vivante : participative, interactive, en construction. Elle est participative dans la mesure où la valeur d'usage social est l'élément primordial de sélection des sujets traités. Plutôt que de retenir seulement des critères formels d'ancienneté et d'authenticité, nous tentons d'identifier et de présenter les biens patrimoniaux les plus valorisés par les communautés elles-mêmes. L'Encyclopédie est aussi vivante par le mode de traitement des articles. Le choix d'une encyclopédie électronique en ligne permet d'illustrer les articles à l'aide d'un riche éventail de documents iconographiques, sonores et audio-visuels. Le lecteur peut ainsi lire, mais aussi voir et entendre le patrimoine en action.

    Nous souhaitons que l'accès aux articles et au matériel multimédia de l'Encyclopédie favorise la circulation de l'information sur le patrimoine de l'Europe et les réappropriations nombreuses et variées de celui-ci. Nous espérons ainsi construire de nouvelles connaissances et créer une communauté dynamique de chercheurs et d'usagers autour du patrimoine de l'Europe.

    La ligne éditoriale de l'Encyclopédie

    La ligne éditoriale de l'Encyclopédie s'articule autour des processus de construction du patrimoine, c'est-à-dire des processus de patrimonialisation, qu'ils soient issus d'initiatives institutionnelles, communautaires ou individuelles. Les auteurs sont donc appelés à mettre en lumière les contextes et les courants culturels, sociaux et politiques qui mènent à la formation d'un patrimoine, à sa perpétuation, à ses adaptations successives et à sa mise en valeur. Dans certains cas, l'Encyclopédie fera état des patrimoines en régression, ou disparus.

    Pour chaque élément du patrimoine retenu, l'auteur décrira sa situation contemporaine, proposera un historique de l'élément patrimonial (site, bâtiment, objet ou pratique) et présentera le parcours de sa construction. Afin d'éviter toute confusion, il faut rappeler que l'Encyclopédie n'a pas pour but de retracer l'histoire de l'Europe, ni de constituer un catalogue de son patrimoine contemporain. Elle vise à développer une perspective dynamique oscillant entre son ancrage historique et ses manifestations contemporaines, une perspective centrée sur l'évolution de ce patrimoine selon des contextes culturels et sociaux en transformation.

    Le contenu des articles

    Chaque texte doit compter un minimum de 1 800 mots et un maximum de 2 400 mots (6 à 9 feuillets à double interligne), en excluant les notes, les légendes des illustrations et la bibliographie ;

    Chaque article doit contenir les six éléments suivants (dans l'ordre) :

    • 1) Un bref paragraphe d'introduction de 75 à 100 mots. Ce paragraphe est une présentation de votre sujet. Il a pour objectif d'attirer l'attention sur les principales caractéristiques du bien patrimonial traité dans l'article. Il doit être clair, autonome et attractif, car il sera diffusé seul à certains endroits du site Web de l'Encyclopédie et il doit inciter les lecteurs à consulter la suite de l'article ;
    • 2) Une description du bien patrimonial retenu (lieu, bâtiment, pratique, personne, ou autre), tel qu'il se présente aujourd'hui ;
    • 3) Une présentation historique du bien patrimonial qui, le cas échéant, rendra compte des emprunts et des transformations successives ;
    • 4) Une analyse des efforts de mise en valeur et de construction de la valeur patrimoniale du sujet au fil du temps, en relation avec les contextes culturels, sociaux, politiques et économiques ;
    • 5) Le nom de l'auteur, son occupation professionnelle et son affiliation institutionnelle ;
    • 6) Une brève bibliographie de 5 à 10 titres, comprenant une sélection d'ouvrages complémentaires et les ouvrages cités dans l'article.

    Le protocole de rédaction

    Nombre de mots :

    Chaque texte doit compter un minimum de 1 800 mots et un maximum de 2 400 mots, en excluant les notes, les légendes des illustrations et la bibliographie ;

    Police :

    •Le texte est écrit en police 12 points de style normal, tel « Times New Roman », sans caractères gras, ni soulignés, ni mots en capitales (que l'on réserve au titre de l'article) ou petites capitales;

    •L'italique n'est utilisé que pour les intertitres de l'article, les mots étrangers et, avec parcimonie, pour les accentuations ; on inscrit aussi bien sûr en italique les titres d'œuvres ;

    Titre :

    Le titre de l'article est de préférence neutre, il annonce le sujet sans le qualifier ; il est placé au début du texte, en lettres majuscules, sans mise en forme.

    Division de l'article :

    •Le premier paragraphe (paragraphe d'introduction) n'est précédé d'aucun intertitre et il apparaît en caractère gras, immédiatement après le titre ;

    •Sections : La suite de l'article doit être subdivisée en sections de longueur variable, identifiées par des intertitres.

    Identification de l'auteur : Le nom de l'auteur, son occupation professionnelle et son affiliation institutionnelle sont placés à la fin de l'article, avant la bibliographie et les notes. Suivent les notes, et enfin la bibliographie.

    Citations : Les citations sont insérées dans le texte entre guillemets et leurs références bibliographiques sont indiquées en notes de fin de document.

    Dates: Les dates doivent être écrites en chiffres romains de la manière suivante :

    Correct

    XIXe

    5e

    1re

    1er

    Incorrect

    XIXème

    19ème

    5ème

    1ère

    1er

    Notes de fin de document :

    • •Les notes de fin de document sont inscrites avec l'appel de note automatique du logiciel Word, sans aucune mise en forme.
    • •Les notes de fin de document respecteront les mêmes règles de présentation que celles de la bibliographie (voir plus bas), sauf pour les noms d'auteur qui seront mis dans l'ordre: prénom nom.

    Bibliographie :

    La bibliographie et les références à un ouvrage, article ou document d'archives cité dans le texte respecteront les règles de présentation suivantes :

    Un auteur

    Griffiths, Naomi, The Acadians: Creation of a People, Toronto, McGraw-Hill, 1973, 94 p.

    Deux auteurs et plus

    Bourque, Hélène, Donald Dion et Brigitte Ostiguy, L'île d'Orléans, un enchantement, Québec, Éditions du Chien Rouge, 1999, 48 p.

    Ouvrage collectif

    Le Blanc, Ronnie-Gilles (Dir.), Du Grand-Dérangement à la Déportation : Nouvelles perspectives historiques, Moncton, Mouvange, 2005, 465 p.

    Article de revue ou de journal

    Collectif, « Dossier île d'Orléans : le Goût de l'île », Continuité, no 73, été 1997, pp.17- 51.

    Rapport de recherche

    Gaulin, André et Norbert Latulippe, L'île d'Orléans, microcosme du Québec, Association québécoise des professeurs de français, Québec, 1984, 137 p.

    Archives – documents textuels

    Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, RG 45, volume 135, carnet de notes d'arpentage no 761, page 33, numéro de reproduction C-88047.

    Films de fiction

    Evangeline, long métrage de Raoul Walsh, États-Unis, 1919, avec Miriam Cooper et Alan Roscoe.

    Films documentaires

    Évangéline en quête, documentaire de Ginette Pellerin, Québec, Office national du film,

    1996.

    Documents électroniques

    « Lieu historique national de Grand Pré », Parcs Canada, site consulté le 29/06/06 [En ligne], http://www.pc.gc.ca/lhn-hs/ns/grandpre/index_f.asp

    Illustrations :

    • •Le texte de chaque article doit être accompagné de 5 ou 6 illustrations : photographies, gravures, dessins ou tableaux, cartes ou schémas.
    • •Les illustrations sont fournies à part et elles sont numérotées. Les auteurs doivent indiquer où ils prévoient les insérer dans le texte, en inscrivant en majuscules : ILLUSTRATION 1, ILLUSTRATION 2, etc., aux endroits appropriés.
    • •Les illustrations sont transmises de préférence en fichiers numériques (résolution minimale de 300dpi, format d'impression 5''X7''), par courriel ou surCD-ROM
    • •L'auteur doit fournir les références complètes de ces illustrations.
    • •De brèves légendes, ou à tout le moins l'identification du sujet de chaque illustration, doivent accompagner les illustrations. Les légendes et références sont placées à la toute fin du texte, après la bibliographie, et elles sont numérotées. (Elles seront transférées à l'endroit approprié dans le texte à l'étape de la mise en page effectuée par l'équipe de l'Encyclopédie).

    Documents audio-visuels et sonores :

    Puisque l'Encyclopédie profite du potentiel d'Internet pour offrir une présentation multimédia des sujets traités, les auteurs sont aussi invités à fournir des documents textuels, sonores ou audiovisuels lorsque cela leur est possible, ainsi que des documents visuels supplémentaires.

    • •Les documents sonores doivent être transmis de préférence en fichiers numériques MP3 ou Wave, mais nous acceptons d'autres supports et formats (tels CD, CD-ROM et cassettes audio). Ces documents doivent aussi être accompagnés des références complètes.

    • •Les documents audio-visuels peuvent être transmis sur divers supports et en divers formats (de préférence en fichiers numériques, sur CD-ROM, ou encore en cassettes vidéo). Ces documents doivent aussi être accompagnés des références complètes.
    • •Les auteurs fourniront alors les références complètes de ces documents.
    • •Quand le sujet s'y prête, les auteurs sont priés de donner des indications qui aideront l'équipe de l'Encyclopédie à repérer de tels documents.
    • •Tous les documents complémentaires seront de préférence libres de droits d'auteur et de diffusion sur Internet.
    • •Dans tous les cas, les auteurs doivent donner les références précises des documents (Auteur, titre, date, localisation, etc.).
    • •Les auteurs doivent donner les informations qui permettront à l'équipe de l'Encyclopédie de vérifier si les documents fournis sont bel et bien libres de droits, ou d'acquérir les droits de ces documents (c'est-à-dire fournir les références et la localisation des documents).
    • •Au besoin, les auteurs peuvent communiquer avec nous pour obtenir des renseignements sur les droits d'auteur et de diffusion, ou pour conclure une entente préalable avec l'équipe de l'Encyclopédie afin de couvrir les coûts d'acquisition des droits de diffusion.
    • •Les auteurs doivent faire parvenir le texte de leur article, ainsi que les documents textuels complémentaires, en fichiers Word, de préférence par courriel, ou sur support informatique (CD-ROM), à l'adresse indiquée à la fin de ce document.
    • •Les illustrations sont transmises de préférence en fichiers numériques (résolution minimale de 300 dpi, format d'impression 5'' x 7''), par courriel ou sur CD-ROM, à l'adresse indiquée à la fin de ce document. Des photos ou diapositives sont aussi acceptées, mais l'équipe de l'Encyclopédie ne s'engage pas à retourner ces documents aux auteurs. Toutes les illustrations doivent être accompagnées des références complètes et des informations permettant leur identification.
    • •Les documents sonores doivent être transmis de préférence en fichiers numériques MP3 ou Wave, mais nous acceptons d'autres supports et formats (tels CD, CD-ROM et cassettes audio). Ces documents doivent aussi être accompagnés des références complètes.
    • •Les documents audiovisuels peuvent être transmis sur divers supports et en divers formats (de préférence en fichiers numériques, sur CD-ROM, ou encore en cassettes vidéo). Ces documents doivent aussi être accompagnés des références complètes.

    • •Les auteurs peuvent communiquer avec nous pour s'informer plus précisément des questions techniques liées aux formats et aux supports des documents./
➦ NEXT